Tag Archives | jazz

Buddy Bolden Blues

Dallas Blues on JOCO label

Back in the early days of the danceband, ad hoc bands with some weird and wonderful names were the norm.

The Original Memphis Five, for example, recorded under such names as Jazzbo’s Carolina Serenaders, Bailey’s Lucky Seven and The Cotton Pickers, despite none of their members having anything to do with the South. The bandleader Johnny Dodds was known for putting together a great group of musicians.

Here’s an example of a band called Blues in Dixieland, playing ‘Buddy Bolden Blues’, a song which began life as ‘Funky-Butt’ by the inspirational cornetist Buddy Bolden. This recording (1949?) is from the compilation Jazz Heritage – Volume IV and the label was a small outfit called JOCO, based in Northfield, Minnesota.

The number features Doc Evans on cornet; Al Jenkins on trombone; Art Lyons on clarinet; Mel Grant on piano; Micky Stienke on drums; and Biddy Bastian on bass. It’s possible that Jelly Roll Morton was also playing – information in the catalogues is often contradictory.

❦ To listen, click the audio player below. ❦

Photo © Rachel Cowan

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Wild Man Blues

Louis-Armstrong-young

I have a passion for old shellac 78rpm records which I play on my cherry red HMV 101 wind-up gramophone. My tastes run from 1920s dancebands through classic French chanteuses et chanteurs to early tango orchestras. The collection is modest by most collectors’ standards (about 120) and is governed purely by the amount of space I have to store the records – 78s are heavy and bulky. Creating a personal collection isn’t a costly affair: I have only one or two rarities and don’t care if a particular record was so popular in 1925 they pressed hundreds of thousands of them. I buy my records, usually costing £1 or £2, from my old friends at The Gramophone Emporium in Edinburgh.

Perhaps surprisingly, I have only a few classical 78s and these are of iconic opera singers of the time. No sopranos though – the recording process wasn’t kind to the soprano sound. But tenors, including of course Caruso, the first real recording star, are a different matter. Singing directly into a huge recording horn with the orchestra placed around and behind the singer, the tenor voice rang out clear and true.

The appeal of 78s is mysterious, but their appeal for me is largely the immediacy of the sound. It’s like sitting in the front row of the stalls as Caruso gives it his all, or leaning on the bar while Fats Waller tinkles the juke joint ivories.

The first taster of my 78s collection is a number by the inimitable Satchmo. As he continued to record right up to his death in the 1970s, most people are familiar with the name of Louis Armstrong, but this earlier recording is Armstrong at his raw best.

Label details:
Wild Man Blues
(Armstrong-Morton)
LOUIS ARMSTRONG
Trumpet Solo, acc. by His Original Washboard Beaters
Parlophone
R 2162

❦ To listen, click the audio player below ❦

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Vintage Jazz

Sissle-&-Blake
In 1924, Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle wrote a stage show named ‘The Chocolate Dandies’. The show was unfortunately ultimately a flop because it failed to fit the stereotypical ‘fast dancing and negroid humor’. The name, however, lived on and was used by a number of different jazz ensembles from the late 1920s to 1940.

Don Redman, one of the first great jazz arrangers, was also a reed player and vocalist, appearing with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra until 1927, when he moved onto McKinney’s Cotton Pickers as well as working with Louis Armstrong and his Savoy Ballroom Five. In 1928, Redman brought together a small group of players to record with Okeh under the name The Chocolate Dandies. My 78rpm record is a pressing by Parlophone Records, headed at that time by Oscar Preuss.

DonRedman

Parlophone established a master leasing arrangement with Okeh and issued the Rhythm Style Series which included the two fabulous 78rpm numbers included here. Cherry was written by Don Redman himself and the vocals may be by him. Four or Five Times, written by Hellman & Gay, have what sounds like a quartet of voices including interjections in a woman’s voice. Note that on one side, the billing is The Big Chocolate Dandies and the other side The Little Chocolate Dandies!

In 1950, Oscar Preuss of Parlophone Records hired a young man named George Martin and five years later, Martin succeeded Preuss. The rest, as they say, is recording history.

‘Cherry’
(Redman)
THE BIG CHOCOLATE DANDIES
With Vocal Refrain
Parlophone
R365

❦ To listen to ‘Cherry’, click the audio player below ❦

‘Four Or Five Times’
(Hellman/Gay)
THE LITTLE CHOCOLATE DANDIES
With Vocal Refrain
Parlophone
R365

❦ To listen to ‘Four Or Five Times’, click the audio player below ❦

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